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Drugged Driving Defense: The ARIDE Program

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > DUI Law  > Drugs & Alcohol  > Drugged Driving Defense: The ARIDE Program

Drugged Driving Defense: The ARIDE Program

drugged drivingDrugged Driving defense attorneys are going to have to learn about the ARIDE program.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s ARIDE course is described as a bridge between the Standardized Field Sobriety Test (SFST) and Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) courses.  ARIDE, which stands for Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement, is a 16-hour course that claims to teach officers how to look for signs of drug impairment (drugged driving) during traffic stops.  The SFST program trains officers to identify and assess drivers suspected of being under the influence of alcohol, while the DEC/DRE program provides more advanced training to evaluate suspected drug impairment. The SFST assessment is typically employed at roadside, while an officer trained as a Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) through the DEC program conducts a 12-step evaluation in a more controlled environment such as a jail or a detention facility.

The drugged driving course begins with a review of the three SFSTs followed by a practice session and then a proficiency exam. The student has two opportunities to properly demonstrate the three tests per NHTSA standards. The student is graded by a qualified NHTSA instructor and a failure to show proficiency within two attempts (if necessary) prohibits the student from continuing on in the ARIDE course.  Once proficiency is shown, the student is introduced to the general concept of “Drugs in the Human Body” and learns about typical ingestion, effects of drugs, observable signs and symptoms of impairment, and then begins the process of learning the seven major drug categories. During this overview the student is briefly introduced to some medical conditions (see session IV, page 8-9). One (1) page of materials out of 98 pages, and about 10 minutes of class time out of 16 hours, is dedicated to the discussion of medical conditions that mimic drug impairment.

Drugged driving is all in the eyes according the ARIDE.  The HGN (horizontal gaze nystagmus) test is used to confirm the possibility of the presence or absence of certain categories “on board,” as will the subjects pupil size, and the same is said for the Lack Of Convergence (LOC) of the eyes. LOC is simply the inability to cross one’s eyes. However, while it is hailed as a valid and reliable indicator, 40% of the population is naturally unable to converge/cross their eyeballs.  These eye “conditions” or “observations” alone or in combination and their presence or absence are the primary method of identifying any single or multiple drug categories.

The seven categories are:

1. Central Nervous System (CNS) Depressants

These are substances that slow down the operation of the brain and CNS. Examples are Alcohol, Zanax, Prozac, and GHB

  • HGN is Present
  • Pupils are NORMAL
  • LOC is PRESENT – the eyes cannot be crossed

2. Central Nervous System (CNS) Stimulants

These are substances that stimulate, or over stimulate the brain and CNS. Examples are Cocaine, Ritalin, and Methamphetamine

  • HGN is NOT Present
  • Pupils are DILATED
  • LOC is NOT PRESENT – eyes can be crossed

3. Hallucinogens

Natural and synthetic substances that impair your ability to perceive reality. Examples are LSD (acid), Peyote, MDMA (ecstasy)

  • HGN is NOT Present
  • Pupils are DILATED
  • LOC is NOT PRESENT – eyes can be crossed

4. Dissociative Anesthetics

The best description of these is PCP and Ketamine (horse tranquilizer).  These were originally developed for use as anesthetics. They are powerful drugs that cause symptoms of both depressants and hallucinogens.

  • HGN is PRESENT
  • Pupils are NORMAL
  • LOC is PRESENT – cannot cross eyes

5. Narcotic Analgesics

Natural and synthetic opiates. Examples are Opium, Morphine, Heroine, Codeine, Demerol, and Methadone. All of these are designed and used for pain relief.

  • HGN is NOT Present
  • Pupils are CONSTRICTED, or pinpoint
  • LOC is NOT PRESENT – can cross

6. Inhalants

These are any number of breathable chemicals or volatile solvents and compounds that are inhaled. Oven cleaner is a particularly dangerous yet common example. While not intended by their manufactures to be used as a drug, they are nevertheless inhaled and produce a high.

  • HGN is PRESENT
  • Pupils are NORMAL
  • LOC is PRESENT – cannot cross eyes

7. Cannabis

The most well known drug category as it includes marijuana, hashish, and a synthetic compound called marinol. Recently, K2, spice, and potpourri are newer synthetic versions.

  • HGN is NOT PRESENT
  • Pupils are DILATED
  • LOC is PRESENT – cannot cross eyes

By the end of 2014, Ohio will have more than 125 DRE officers dedicated to removing drug-impaired drivers from Ohio roadways. Additionally, nearly every sergeant and trooper in the OSHP has received Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement (ARIDE) training, which provides officers with general knowledge related to drug impairment. ARIDE training is now being provided to all agencies throughout Ohio.

Drugged Driving attorney Charles M. Rowland II dedicates his practice to defending the accused drunk driver (and drugged driver) in the Miami Valley and throughout Ohio.  He has the credentials and the experience to win your case and has made himself Dayton’s choice for drunk driving defense. Contact Charles Rowland by phone at (937) 318-1384 or toll-free at 1-888-ROWLAND (888-769-5263). If you need assistance after hours, call the 24/7 DUI Hotline at (937) 776-2671.  You can have DaytonDUI at your fingertips by downloading the DaytonDUI Android App or have DaytonDUI sent directly to your mobile device by texting DaytonDUI (one word) to 50500.  Follow DaytonDUI on Facebook, @DaytonDUI on Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Pheed and Pintrest or get RSS of the Ohio DUI blog.  You can email CharlesRowland@DaytonDUI.com or visit his office at 2190 Gateway Dr., Fairborn, Ohio 45324.  “All I do is DUI defense.”

 Find information on defense of drugged driving and other city-specific info at the following links:

FairbornDaytonSpringfieldKetteringVandaliaXeniaMiamisburgSpringboro,Huber HeightsOakwoodBeavercreekCenterville

Charles Rowland

charlie@daytondui.com

Charles M. Rowland II has been representing the accused drunk driver for over 20 years. Contact him at (937) 318-1384 if you find yourself facing a DUI (now called OVI) charge.

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