a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2017 Dayton DUI.
All Rights Reserved.

9:00 - 17:00

Our Opening Hours Mon. - Fri.

937.318.1384

Call 24/7 - Free Consultation!

Facebook

Twitter

Search
OVI Menu
 

Drugs & Alcohol

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > DUI Law  > Drugs & Alcohol (Page 5)

Ohio OVI Law: The Habitual Offender Registry

Ohio OVI law states that you  can't be a chronic alcoholic and drive in Ohio.  Ohio driver's license laws forbid the issuance of a driver's license to, or the retention of a license by, a person who is "alcoholic, or is addicted to the use of controlled substances to the extent that the use constitutes an impairment to the person's ability to operate a motor vehicle with the required degree of safety" (Ohio R.C. 4507.08(D)(1).  Such persons will be placed on Ohio's Habitual Offender Registry.If you have an OVI conviction after September 30, 2008 and you have four or more prior OVI (or equivalent) convictions in...

Continue reading

The Wright State Three-Day Weekend Intervention Program (by DaytonDUI)

Information about the Wright State University Weekend Intervention Program can be found at their web site [HERE], or by contacting the Director:  Phyllis Cole, M.A., Director Center for Interventions, Treatment and Addictions Research 110 Medical Sciences Building Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway Dayton, OH 45435(937) (937) 775-3050 Fax: (937) 775-2629 E-mail: wip@wright.edu You can also access PROGRAM DATES, get on-line REGISTRATION FORMS, learn the RULES & REGULATIONS, get DIRECTIONS to the W.I.P. program, and learn WHAT TO EXPECT. Here are some frequently asked questions about the Wright State Weekend Intervention Program.Is the WIP like jail? No, WIP isn't like jail. Ohio's drunk driving law is a...

Continue reading

Ohio DUI Law: How To Fight A Urine Test

In order to successfully defend a urinalysis case, a DUI defense lawyer must be familiar with Ohio's DUI law (O.R.C. 4511.19) and the Ohio Administrative Code sections which apply to the collection, storing, transporting and testing of the urine specimen.  Amphetamine, cocaine, heroine, Marijuana, Methamphetamine, Phencyclidine and L.S.D. are specifically mentioned in Ohio's DUI/OVI statute as illegal controlled substances. The law states how much of each substance must be detected in a chemical test of urine, whole blood, blood plasma, and/or blood serum in order to sustain a charge.  While less reliable than a blood or breath test, the urine...

Continue reading

Ohio OVI Law: Impairment by Drugs

Ohio is making the transition to using the Drug Recognition Expert protocol in apprehending and prosecuting impaired drivers.   DRE refers not only to the officers themselves, but to the 12-step procedure that these officers use. DRE was developed by police officers from the Los Angeles (California) Police Department. In 1979, the Drug Recognition program received the official recognition of the LAPD.  On October 22, 2010, Ohio became the 48th state to be accepted into the International Association of Chiefs of Police's (IACP) Drug Evaluation and Classification Program (DECP).Once approved by the IACP's DECP Highway Safety Committee, Ohio was eligible to provide the DRE...

Continue reading

20 Golden Rules from Ohio Lawyers Assistance Program

1. Behave yourself.2. Answer the phone.3. Return your phone calls.4. Pay your bills.5. Keep your hands off your clients’ money.6. Tell the truth.7. Admit ignorance.8. Be honorable.9. Defend the honor of your fellow attorneys.10. Be gracious and thoughtful.11. Value the time of your fellow attorneys.12. Give straight answers.13. Avoid the need to go to court.14. Think first.15. Remember: You are first a professional and then a businessman. If you seek riches, become a businessman and hire an attorney.16. Remember: There is no such thing as billing 3,000 hours a year.17. Tell your clients how to behave. If they can’t they...

Continue reading

Driving and Drugs: Ohio’s Per Se Marijuana Law

 Wondering if you can get charged with an OVI from Marijuana? While it is well established that alcohol consumption increases accident risk, evidence of marijuana's culpability in on-road driving accidents and injury is far less clear. Although acute cannabis intoxication following inhalation has been shown to mildly impair psychomotor skills, this impairment is seldom severe or long lasting.  According to the US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. State of Knowledge of Drugged Driving: FINAL REPORT. op. cit., "Experimental research on the effects of cannabis ...

Continue reading

Ohio OVI: Standardized Field Sobriety Tests & Marijuana

State v. Dixon, 2007-Ohio-5189 (Ohio Ct. App. 12th Dist. Clermont County 2007).More and more, we are seeing law enforcement officers arrest drivers on suspicion of operating a vehicle under the influence of marijuana.  Often, an officer will request a urine test for marijuana after a defendant has blown substantially under the per se alcohol limit on a breath test machine.  This raises questions about the proper determination of probable cause.  If, for example, no alcohol was suspected how did the officer arrive deduce enough evidence to make an arrest? Were the standardized field sobriety tests administered to detect alcohol or...

Continue reading

Ohio OVI Law: The Coming DRE Expert

Ohio is making the transition to using the Drug Recognition Expert protocol in apprehending and prosecuting impaired drivers.   DRE refers not only to the officers themselves, but to the 12-step procedure that these officers use. DRE was developed by police officers from the Los Angeles (California) Police Department. In 1979, the Drug Recognition program received the official recognition of the LAPD.  On October 22, 2010, Ohio became the 48th state to be accepted into the International Association of Chiefs of Police's (IACP) Drug Evaluation and Classification Program (DECP). Once approved by the IACP's DECP Highway Safety Committee, Ohio was eligible to...

Continue reading

DUI Science: Are Gastric Bypass Patients More Susceptible to a DUI?

According to the results of a new study in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, the dramatic changes that occur as a result of gastric bypass surgery can cause some people to overindulge when using alcohol thereby increasing their risk for a DUI. As cited at by Science Daily (linked HERE): Studies have shown that gastric bypass patients often find it difficult adjusting to physical and psychological changes after the procedure. An increased risk of depression, alcoholism, and other substance abuse issues for this patient population led researchers to take a more in-depth look at how...

Continue reading