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DUI Law

Urine Testing: No Privacy For You!

The rules for urine testing in Ohio are set forth at Ohio Administrative Code 3701-53-05 & 3701-53-06.  At O.A.C. 3701-53-05, it is clearly stated that a urine test must be witnessed.  It states at subsection (D), (D) The collection of a urine specimen must be witnessed to assure that the sample can be authenticated. Urine shall be deposited into a clean glass or plastic screw top container which shall be capped, or collected according to the laboratory protocol as written in the laboratory procedure manual. In urine testing cases, the state has the burden to prove substantial compliance with the regulations upon...

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When Stopped On Suspicion of DUI – Should I Blow?

When you are stopped on suspicion of DUI the question becomes - "Should I Blow?"  Unfortunately, the answer is "maybe" and involves a very complicated investigation of the facts of your case and your personal history.  You should NEVER refuse the test without understanding how a refusal would affect YOU.  No attorney can know all of the circumstances of your arrest and your personal history, always ask to speak to an attorney when making this decision.Learn how the Breathalyzer test affects your DUI defense in this video. Can you answer "TRUE" to ALL of the following questions? If so, you can politely DECLINE any police...

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Alcohol And Your Body: A Primer

About 20% of the alcohol (actually the impairing substance is ethanol) in your beverage is absorbed in the stomach and the remaining 80% is absorbed in the small intestine.  How fast it is absorbed is dependent on various factors.The higher the percentage in the beverage, the faster the absorption; Are you mixing? Carbonated beverages tend to speed up absorption; Hungry? Food in your stomach slows down the absorption;When it is absorbed it looks for the water in your blood and body.  Fat does not matter as ethanol does not dissolve in fat. The inebriating effects are present when the concentration in the blood...

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OVI Trial Practice: Admission of the Alcohol Influence Report

The Alcohol Influence Report is a document prepared by the arresting officer noting each and every indicator for alcohol impairment that they took note of in their investigation.  Most of the forms require that the officer simply check the predetermined indicator.  Not surprisingly, all the officer's observations fall neatly into these predetermined areas. The report is a document of the officers opinions and should not be considered routine ministerial reports of a non-adversarial nature.   Clearly, letting the jury have this document as evidence to review in the jury room would be prejudicial to an OVI defense.Evidence Rule 803(8) excludes...

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DUI Law: What Did SCOTUS Say In Missouri v. McNeely

If you have been following developments in DUI law, you have no doubt heard about the United States Supreme Court decision in Missouri v. McNeely, 133 S.Ct. 1552 (2013).  The case deals with when, and under what circumstances the government is required to seek a warrant prior to drawing blood from a suspected DUI offender. Below is a quote from the case which provides a reasonable (and short) analysis of the case.  If you want to read the full opinion please click on the case name above. In Schmerber v. California, 384 U.S. 757, 86 S.Ct. 1826, 16 L.Ed.2d 908 (1966), this Court upheld...

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Ohio DUI Law R.C 4511.19(A)(2) “a codified dilema”

Ohio DUI law R.C. 4511.19(A)(2) enhances the penalty for a motorist who, having been convicted once in the last six (6) years, after having been arrested, refuses to take a blood, breath or urine test.  In State v. Hoover,173 Ohio App.3d 487, 2007-Ohio-5773, the issue of whether or not a person can have a DUI sentence enhanced pursuant to R.C. 4511.19(A)(2) for refusing to take a chemical test was before the Ohio Supreme Court.  The government sought to have the sentence of Corey Hoover enhanced from the ten (10) day mandatory penalty for a second time DUI offender in Ohio to...

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Determining Probable Cause For An OVI Offense

A warrantless arrest must be supported by probable cause in order to be constitutionally valid. State v. Timson, 38 Ohio St.2d 122, 67 Ohio Op.2d 140, 311 N.E.2d 16 (1974).  In order to make a finding that probable (more likely than not) cause existed the court must look at the totality of the circumstances surrounding the arrest. State v. Miller,  117 Ohio App.3d 750, 691 N.E.2d 703 (11th Dist. Court of Appeals 1997), State v. Brandenburg, 41 Ohio App.3d 109, 534 N.E.2d 906 (2nd Dist. Court of Appeals, Montgomery County 1987). "[B]ecause of the mosaic which is analyzed for a...

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It Is The Anniversary Of The Parking Ticket

Seventy nine years ago this month, the Reverend Charles H. North of the Oklahoma Third Pentecostal Holiness Church became the first person to every receive a parking ticket.  The controversial "Park-O-Meter" had been installed in the prior weeks and caused a stir amongst the residents.According to his grandson Dwight Thurmond the parking citation was issued after his grandfather rooted through his coat for the required nickel.  Finding none, he trudged over to the nearby grocery store to get change. Little did he know he was about to become a historical footnote. When he returned he curiously examined a white piece...

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Judges Express Concerns Over Ignition Interlock Implementation

As Ohio is contemplating "Annie's Law" which would require Ignition Interlock Devices for every first-time OVI offender, it is important to look at how implementation went in other states.  The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently released a report on Arizona's adoption of the law. DOT HS 812 025, Ignition Interlock: An Investigation into Rural Arizona Judges’ Perceptions, Fred Cheesman, Matthew Kleiman, Cynthia G. Lee, and Kathryn Holt (May, 2014).   In 2007, Arizona became the second state in the nation to require all first-time drunk driving offenders to equip their vehicles with ignition interlock devices. The first was Arizona’s...

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Vehicle Forfeiture: Where Does The Money Go?

Have you ever wondered where the money goes following a vehicle forfeiture?Does your police agency have some really cool sports cars, tricked out SUVs or ruggedly expensive off-road vehicles?  Chances are they got it via Ohio's vehicle forfeiture law.  Pursuant to R.C. 4503.234(C)(1), the agency that arrested a defendant has a virtual right of first refusal on any forfeited vehicle.  All they have to do is satisfy the lienholder or the innocent non-owners interest if they have protected their interest in the vehicle.If law enforcement does not want the vehicle it will be sent to auction.  Prior to the sale...

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