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DUI Law

Did You Sign The Ticket? (by DaytonDUI)

An often-overlooked piece of exculpatory evidence is your signature. When the officer has read and explained your rights prior to conducting an evidential breath test, he or she will ask you to sign a form entitled the  BMV Form 2255 Notice of Administrative License Suspension.  Under Ohio Revised Code 4511.192 (A) "The officer SHALL give that advice in a written form that contains the information described in division (B) of [that] section and SHALL read the advice to the person. The form shall contain a statement that the form was SHOWN to the person under arrest and read to the person by...

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DUI Breath Test Defense: Core Body Temperature as a Defense to a Breath Test

Took the Breath Test and wondering if you still have a case?   The cornerstone of evidential breath testing is the scientific principle called Henry's law, named after pioneering chemist William Henry in 1803.  Henry's Law states, At a constant temperature, the amount of a given gas that dissolves in a given type and volume of liquid is directly proportional to the partial pressure of that gas in equilibrium with that liquid. In evidential breath testing, Henry's Law allows the machine to assume it can measure the alcohol (ethanol)  in your breath as a ratio to the ethanol in your blood.  That is why...

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Setting the Standard For Excellence

Today I am attending the Ohio Academy of Criminal Defense Lawyers/National College for DUI Defense advanced DUI seminar in Columbus, Ohio.  The three-day seminar brings together the best DUI attorneys and experts from across the nation to discuss topics ranging from pharmacology to how to talk to jurors.  It takes a great deal of effort to stay on the cutting edge of DUI defense and this type of seminar gives an attorney the edge in the courtroom.   If you are in need of a  DUI attorney who is dedicated to providing you with the best scientific defense possible, please...

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OVI Trial Strategy: The Cop Was Not A Liar (by DaytonDUI)

Most Americans trust and respect police officers.  If you think that you will be able to go into a courtroom and overcome this ingrained belief you are, most of the time, dead wrong.  Americans do not like drunk drivers.  If you think that you can win an OVI case by calling the police officer a liar, you will probably lose.  One of the biggest mistakes an attorney can make is to position your case so that the jury must choose between believing the officer's version of events or your version of events.  Jury verdict research suggest a modified approach.The officer...

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OVI Blood Test Defense: Microbial Contamination

Blood cases present the opportunity for multiple scientific defenses, but only if we recognize them and present them in a coherent manner before our judges.  Many of these scientific defenses can arise from problems in the blood draw.  If the blood draw is flawed microorganisms may contaminate the blood sample.  If this happens sugars (natrually present in the blood) can be converted into ethanol, resulting in a fasley high test.  Candida albicans is a yeast that lives on just about everything and is resistant to most preservatives.  In Lakatuka, D.J., “The Effect of Microbial Contamination of the Blood Sample on the Determination...

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Intoxilyzer 8000 Upheld in Ohio’s 11th and 12th Appellate Courts

When you are accused of a DUI/OVI in Ohio, the breath test machine is presumed to be perfect.  What is more, your attorney cannot challenge scientifically provable flaws in the machine or the weakness in the science supporting the machine.  Such challenges are limited by a 1984 Ohio Supreme Court ruling (State v. Vega) holding that once the Ohio Department of Health certifies a machine, it becomes valid and the defendant loses the ability to argue defenses based on the underlying science of the machine.  This author has made it a long-standing goal to fight this case and has done so...

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Driving Privileges: Can A Court Prevent Me From Drinking?

A trial court is vested with a great amount of discretion in issuing limited driving privileges under an Administrative License Suspension.  A court may require, as a condition of allowing you to have pre-trial limited driving privileges, that you abstain from the use of alcohol.  The issuing court also has the discretion to order you to put bright yellow, shame-plates on your car and can order you to wear a transdermal alcohol detection unit (commonly called the S.C.R.A.M., "Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitor").  What is more, the court will make you pay for the installation and monitoring of the device....

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Defending The Accusation Of Slurred Speech (by DaytonDUI)

A very common observation by law enforcement in an impaired driving investigation is the presence of "slurred speech."  Experience trial counsel will look to the totality of evidence to combat the damning accusation of slurred speech.Many traffic stops are now captured on video tape.  As the quality of the recordings has improved we are often able to hear exactly what the officer is hearing.  Reasonable people can disagree as to whether or not the speech on a video is "slurred" and whether or not it was fair for the officer to describe the speech as slurred.  Another, more subtle method...

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OVI Breath Test Defenses: Exposure to Toulene

In some instances, defendants have argued that exposure to certain chemicals have caused involuntary intoxication.  Commonly, they will cite to the chemical toulene also known as methylbenzene, phenylmethane, and Toluol.  The chemical is a clear water-insoluble liquid with the typical smell of paint thinners, redolent of the sweet smell of the related compound benzene. Toluene is a common solvent, able to dissolve paints, paint thinners, silicone sealants, many chemical reactants, rubber, printing ink, adhesives (glues), lacquers, leather tanners, and disinfectants. The observed effects after consuming dizziness, euphoria, grandiosity, floating sensation, drowsiness, reduced ability to concentrate, slowed reaction time, distorted perception of time...

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Aggravated Vehicular Homicide, O.R.C. 2903.06

Aggravated Vehicular Homicide, O.R.C. 2903.06,  is a crime that results from the death of another caused by the defendant's operating a vehicle while impaired (a violation of R.C. 4511.19)  or while driving negligently or recklessly.  The statute  encompasses driving an automobile recklessly or negligently (called Vehicular homicide) whether or not alcohol played a part in the death.  Often, defendants are indicted for multiple counts, with additional counts for each victim of the accident.Under the reckless section of the statute you will be found guilty of a third degree felony which rises to a second degree felony if the driver is...

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