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DWI, DUI, OMVI, OVI, Drunk Driving – Is There Any Difference?

DWI, DUI, OMVI, OVI, Drunk Driving - Is There Any Difference? Spoiler Alert: DWI, DUI, OMVI and OVI all mean the same thing.  Operating a vehicle under the influence alcohol violates Ohio Revised Code 4511.19. Colloquially, the most common way to describe drunk driving is by referring to it as a DUI. In addition, news organizations use the term DWI. DWI (driving while impaired) is also frequently used to describe drunk driving.Here in Ohio we don't use DWI, DUI or OMVI to describe the legal charge.  In 1982, Ohio enacted a law that refers to driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs...

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The Importance of the Burden of Proof

We want our judges to stand up for the highest tenets of justice and apply the burden of proof in a fair and impartial way - especially when the pressure is on.  Here is a very pertinent quote from the Charlotte Observer. The law presumes every citizen innocent, even when charged with DWI. A judge violates the judicial oath when he or she presumes that a citizen charged with DWI is guilty, gives greater weight to the state's evidence, is predisposed to find for the state, or looks for ways to assist the state in the prosecution of a case. Judges...

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OVI or DUI (Which is right?)

The current version of Ohio's impaired driving law is O.R.C. 4511.19, is entitled "Operating vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs - OVI."  This is the same offense which is also known as DUI (driving under the influence), OMVI (operating a vehicle impaired), DWI (driving while intoxicated) or drunk driving.  The Ohio General Assembly changed the acronym to connote the broadening of the law from simply alcohol impairment to any drug (or condition?) which may impair.  The term "operate" also has a broader definition than that of "driving."  For example, if a driver is found behind the wheel of...

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Is The Smell Of Alcohol Enough To Justify Field Sobriety Testing?

Standardized Field Sobriety Tests: Is Smell Enough? Some Ohio courts have upheld determinations that the mere presence of a moderate to strong odor of alcohol, coupled with a proper initial stop, is sufficient to justify the administration of field sobriety tests. See, e.g., State v. Tackett, 2d Dist. No. 2011-CA-15, 2011-Ohio-6711 (“[t]his court has, however, repeatedly held that a strong odor of alcohol alone is sufficient to provide an officer with reasonable suspicion of criminal behavior”). See also State v. Schott, 2d Dist. No. 1415, 1997 Ohio App. LEXIS 2061 (May 16, 1997); State v. Haucke, 2d Dist. No. 99 CA...

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OVI Checkpoint In Middletown & Wapakoneta (December 7, 2012)

A drunk driving checkpoint will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. Friday night through Saturday on Ohio 4 north of Wilbraham Road in Middletown, the Ohio State Highway Patrol announced this morning.The Auglaize County checkpoint will run from 8pm until midnight on Bellefountain St (near I-75) in Wapakoneta.Put DaytonDUI in your cell phone now (937)776-2671.  If you want to receive updated information on sobriety checkpoints,  enhanced traffic enforcement, saturation patrols and other important developments that affect you, sign up for text alerts on the main page of this blog.  Text alerts will be sent directly to your mobile device/smartphone in...

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OVI Case Update: State v. Bayer, 2012-Ohio-5469

The question raised in State v. Bayer involved whether or not a person can be sentenced for OVI (O.R.C. 4511.19) if that person is also convicted of Aggravated Vehicular Assault (O.R.C. 2903.08) arising from the same incident.  Crimes that involve similar activity are often merged for purposes of sentencing.  The merger turns on whether or not the crimes are similar enough to be deemed "allied offenses of similar import."In this case, the Defendant caused "serious physical harm" to a person while driving with a prohibited alcohol concentration above 0.17%.  In March 2011 she pled guilty to Aggravated Vehicular Assault and to one...

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Fight Your Marked Lanes Violations, O.R.C. 4511.33 (by Dayton DUI)

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has developed a guide for detecting drunk drivers.  In that guide, NHTSA identifies 24 "clues" that potentially impaired drivers exhibit.  Many of those "clues" relate to the driver's ability to maintain proper lane position.  Your attorney should aggressively defend your driving and point out to a judge or jury other possible causes of weaving such as: texting, eating, telephone calls, conversations with other passengers, changing the radio station, stretching, or fatigue may account for the driving.Your DUI defense lawyer should also be prepared to argue that your weaving may not violate Ohio law. ...

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Proof Beyond All Reasonable Doubt And Other Closing Arguments (by DaytonDUI)

Imagine that you woke up with a sore throat.  It persists throughout the day and into the next.  As the week drags on you feel worse and worse and your wife demands that you go to the doctor.  You hate doctors, but you feel so lousy that you agree to get your throat checked out.  When you arrive you fill out the requisite forms and wait longer than you feel is necessary.  Just as you are nearing your boiling point a nurse calls your name and leads you into a small room.  You tell her that you've had a sore...

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The 47 Types & 38 Causes of Nystagmus; (It’s Not Just Caused by Alcohol)

The horizontal gaze nystagmus test is an eye test approved by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration(hereinafter NHTSA) as a tool to detect clues of impairment in drivers. The HGNtest is one of three psychomotor tests approved as part of the standardized field sobriety testing protocol employed by law enforcement officers throughout the United States and used here in Ohio. The HGN is a test of your eyes wherein the testing officer is looking for abnormal movements call saccades.  These movements make the eye appear to bounce or wobble.  The officer uses this movement to make a correlation to alcohol use.  This would valid only if we are...

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Motorcycles and DUI in Ohio

IN HONOR OF STUGIS, HERE IS SOME INFORMATION ON MOTORCYCLES AND DUI The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has developed a guide specific to motorcycle operators.  The basis of this motorcycle guide are based on a 1993 study, The Detection of DWI Motorcyclists, DOT HS 807 839, March 1993; Jack W. Stuster, Anacapa Sciences Inc., wherein police reports were used to identify "cues" of impaired drivers.  Over 100 "cues" were narrowed down to 14.  NHTSA lables 7 of these "cues" as "excellent" predictors of impairment and 7 are considered "good" predictors of impairment.  According to NHTSA "excellent" is defined as...

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