a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2019 Dayton DUI.
All Rights Reserved.

9:00 - 17:00

Our Opening Hours Mon. - Fri.

Facebook

Twitter

Search
OVI Menu
 

Ethanol Tag

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "Ethanol"

Alcohol And Your Body: A Primer

About 20% of the alcohol (actually the impairing substance is ethanol) in your beverage is absorbed in the stomach and the remaining 80% is absorbed in the small intestine.  How fast it is absorbed is dependent on various factors.The higher the percentage in the beverage, the faster the absorption; Are you mixing? Carbonated beverages tend to speed up absorption; Hungry? Food in your stomach slows down the absorption;When it is absorbed it looks for the water in your blood and body.  Fat does not matter as ethanol does not dissolve in fat. The inebriating effects are present when the concentration in the blood...

Continue reading

DUI Science: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Defending a DUI (now called OVI in Ohio) requires an attorney to understand how the body reacts to the impairing substance (pharmacokinetics) and how the brain is affected by the substance (pharmacodynamics).  Pharmacokinetics explains the absorption, distribution and elimination of the drug.  Pharmacodynamics includes the action of the drug on the brain, pharmacologic effects and toxicity. [Holford, N., Chapter 3: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: Rational Dosing and the Time Course of Drug Action, in B. Katzung, Editor, McGraw Hill, Eighth Edition, 2001, p. 36].  Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are explained in this short introductory video.Charles M. Rowland II has attended...

Continue reading

The Problems With Portable Breath Tests (by DaytonDUI)

In possibly the best article you will ever read on portable breath testing, DUI attorneys Justin McShane and Josh Lee describe the portable breath test devises which are used by the Ohio State Highway Patrol as a "potentially dangerous, non-specific and non-selective measures at roadside."  You can find the article HERE and in the Voice for the Defense. The Problems of Fuel Cell Devices1.1. Lack of Specificity20 for EthanolAs PBTs are used for purportedly forensic purposes, their specificity for ethanol becomes a critical factor. The electrochemical detector is not specific for ethanol.21 Indeed, there is “much evidence to show” they are actually not...

Continue reading

Calibration of the Intoxilyzer 8000, O.A.C. 3701-53-04

The revised Ohio Administrative Code section 3701-53-04 incorporates the new rules for calibrations of the Intoxilyzer 8000. See O.A.C. 3701-53-04(B) as set forth below.  The "new" standards "automatically perform a dry gas control test before and after every subject test and instrument certification using a dry gas standard traceable to the national institute of standards and technology (NIST).  The dry gas results "are valid when the results are at or within five one-thousandths (0.005) grams per two hundred ten liters of the alcohol concentration on the manufacturer's certificate of analysis for that dry gas standard. A dry gas control result which...

Continue reading

The Drunken Monkey Theory

Why do we Homo sapiens love alcohol? Could it be that our love of alcohol is genetically encoded in our species due to millions of years of evolution?  Fossilized teeth show that between 45 million and 34 million years ago, human ancestors and our closest relatives -gorillas, chimpanzees and orangutans - ate a diet that was rich in fruit.  Natural selection favored primates who could detect and appreciate the smell of fruit and out-compete others in its collection.  As the fruit fell from the source and lay on the ground, the yeast on the fruits skin would consume the sugar molecules...

Continue reading

Residual Mouth Alcohol, Slope Detectors and the 20 Minute Observation

One of the most prevalent causes of error in breath-alcohol analysis is the presence of alcohol in the mouth.  This residual mouth alcohol (hereinafter R.M.A.) contaminates the expired breath captured by the machine and elevates the test results radically.  The BAC Datamaster’s computer is programmed to assume that a breath test reading is 100% deep-lung (alveolar) air.  This captured “deep-lung” air is then multiplied by 2100 pursuant to the accepted and scientifically defensible partition ratio.[1] Using these built-in assumptions it is evident that a very small amount of undigested (or trapped) alcohol can have a disproportionate impact on the reading.At...

Continue reading

Urine Tests Produce Too Many False Positives

The EtG test is a biomarker test that detects the presence of ethyl glucuronide in urine samples. Usually, it is used to monitor alcohol consumption in individuals who are legally prohibited from drinking alcohol by the justice system or restricted from drinking by their employers. (Source)  The EtG urine alcohol test has come under criticism because it is so sensitive that "it can give positive results for merely coming in contact with common household products that contain alcohol, such as aftershave and mouthwash." The Role of Biomarkers in the Treatment of...

Continue reading

The BAC DataMaster: Margin of Error and Interfering Substances

HOW THE MACHINE WORKS[1]The BAC DataMaster is an evidential breath testing machine which works on the principles of infrared spectrophotometry.  Many vapors, including ethanol in the breath, absorb[2] infrared energy.  The machine captures a breath sample in its testing chamber and sends a beam of infrared energy through the sample.[3] When infrared energy passes through the ethanol molecule[4], the molecule begins to vibrate at its Hydro-Carbon bond and in the process uses up some, or all, of the energy.[5] Repeated scientific experimentation has allowed chemists to conclude that ethanol vibrates at – to varying degrees – are 3.4, 5 and...

Continue reading

Ohio DUI Defense: BAC DataMaster and “Interference”

What Does It Mean When My BAC DataMaster Ticket Shows an Interfering Substance? HOW IT WORKS: The BAC DataMaster is made with two filters which work to assure that only ethanol is present in a test result.  The filters rely on simple chemistry (different absorption curves/different micron levels for interferants) to prevent acetone, methanol, isopropyl or other interfering substances from artificially increasing the result.  When an interferant is present the two filters try to reach the same ethanol result.  To get to the same ethanol level, the machine subtracts the interfering substance (derived from...

Continue reading