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Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "juvenile dui"

Juvenile DUI Offenses Cannot Be Used To Enhance Sentence

If you have a juvenile DUI offense on your record, this is big! In a 4-3 decision impacting juvenile DUI cases, State v. Hand, Slip Opinion No. 2016-Ohio-5504, the Ohio Supreme Court declared that treating cases from juvenile court as prior convictions for adult-sentencing purposes is unconstitutional, violating the due-process clauses of the Ohio and U.S. constitutions, and is “fundamentally unfair.” Writing For the Majority...

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Ohio Supreme Court Address Juvenile Prior OVI Offenses

In State v. Bode, 144 Ohio St.3d 155, 2015-Ohio-1519, the Ohio Supreme Court decided an issue affecting juveniles and the ability of the state to enhance a DUI charge based on prior juvenile adjudications.As a juvenile, the defendant was arrested for violating an equivalent offense 4511.19(A)(1)(a), colloquially referred to as a DUI charge. He was not represented by counsel. By 2011 Bode had been convicted of three more DUI charges. In 2011, Bode was indicted for and convicted of felony DUI charges. The cases were felonies because of Ohio enhancement statute R.C. 4511.19(G)(1)(d), which relied on his prior juvenile offense...

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Is It A Crime To Refuse To Take A Breath Test?

Is it a crime to refuse to take a breath test? Ohio has adopted O.R.C. 4511.19(A)(2) which makes it a crime to refuse to take an evidentiary chemical test if you have a prior OVI (drunk driving)  or OVUAC (juvenile/underage drunk driving) conviction any time within the last twenty (20) years.  If you refuse and you have a prior within twenty (20) years then the penalties for your OVI offense will be double the mandatory minimum. (See generally the "Penalties" section of the DaytonDUI blog).Professional drivers who refuse to take a breath test face a separate crime if they do not...

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Operating A Vehicle After Underage Consumption: Ohio’s Juvenile OVI Law

Ohio has made illegal the practice of operating a vehicle after underage consumption (OVUAC).  O.R.C. 4511.19(B) makes it illegal for persons under 21 years of age to drive a vehicle with a concentration of .02 percent, but less than .08 percent by weight of alcohol by whole blood or breath, or with an equivalent amount by blood serum or plasma or urine.  (1994 S.B. 82, eff. 5/4/94).  In 2004, amended R.C. 4511.19(B) renamed the offense “operating a vehicle after underage consumption” (OVUAC).  These quasi-zero tolerance levels are justified by the fact that this age group accounts for a “disproportionate share of alcohol-related accidents.”...

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Ohio DUI Laws: An Overview

This post collects together in one place many of the Ohio DUI Laws that arise in drunk driving cases.   Some Ohio DUI laws are listed because law enforcement will charge these offenses to establish probable cause for pulling over your vehicle.  If you need to find out more about a specific law, or how the statute has been interpreted or applied, call Charles M. Rowland II at (937) 318-1384 or read about the specific Ohio DUI law at the Ohio DUI Law Blog.Operating a Vehicle Impaired (OVI); O.R.C. 4511.19 This is Ohio's drunk driving statute (Ohio's DUI law).  It is a...

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Arrested for DUI on Thanksgiving?

If you find yourself in need of a qualified DUI/OVI attorney in the Miami Valley due to an OVI arrest over this Thanksgiving weekend, please contact Charles M. Rowland II at (937) 318-1DUI (1384).  We work hard to bring you the best information on Ohio's tough drunk driving laws.  If this is your first visit to the Ohio DUI/OVI Blog consider starting your search for an attorney by reading the following articles.  We offer a free consultation and a 24-hour DUI Hot-line at 937-776-2671.How to Hire a DUI Attorney Unintended Consequences of a DUI About Chalres Rowland Contact Charles Rowland Miami Valley Municipal Court...

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Underage Consumption in Ohio

Underage possession or consumption of beer or intoxicants is a serious crime in Ohio.  The charges are first-degree misdemeanors carrying a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and up to a $1,000.00 fine.  Worse yet, a conviction may leave you with a “criminal record” which is much more serious than a fine or costs.  Fear, shame or guilt may compel you to want to plead guilty to put the charge behind you, but that decision may have long-lasting and unintended consequences.If you are under 21 years old, drinking alcohol is illegal in the State of Ohio.  Ohio Revised Code...

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Montgomery County Courts (An Overview)

If you are arrested for DUI in Montgomery County, Ohio, your case will be heard in one of the courts below. Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas.  This court hears all felony level cases including aggravated vehicular homicide, aggravated vehicular assault and felony-enhanced DUI offenses.  The Court is located in the Montgomery County Courts Building at 41 N. Perry Street in downtown Dayton.  The Judges who serve the Montgomery County Court of Common Please are: Dennis Adkins, Steven Dankof, Barbara P. Gorman (Administrative and Presiding Judge), Mary Katherine Huffman, Dennis J. Langer, Frances E. McGee, Timothy N. O’Connell, Connie S. Price, Gregory F. Singer, Michael L. Tucker, and Mary Wiseman.  You can contact the...

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Limited Driving Privileges

The Limits on Limited Driving PrivilegesRevised Code 4510.021 authorizes courts to grant "limited driving privileges." The Ohio General Assembly  has taken steps to restrict when a court can grant privileges.   A court cannot grant you driving privileges under the following circumstances: (1) If you have been charged with an OVI or OVUAC the legislature has enacted "hard-time" during which the court cannot grant you privileges.  In effect, they are acting to restrict a court from conforming with the American principle that you are innocent until proven guilty.  This author has taken the position that the ability to drive is a right...

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Juvenile DUI Addressed in Ohio Supreme Court

The issue the Ohio Supreme Court addresses in State v. Adkins, 2011-Ohio-3141  is whether a pre-January 1, 1996 juvenile adjudication can be considered one of the five prior similar offenses necessary to enhance an R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(a) charge for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol (“OVI”). Under R.C. 4511.19(G)(1)(d), an OVI is a fourth-degree felony if the defendant has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to five OVIs in 20 years.  Effective January 1, 1996, the Ohio legislature passed a new law making a prior juvenile adjudication constitutes a prior conviction for purposes of R.C. 4511.19(G)(1)(d).PROCEDURAL HISTORYOn...

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