a

Facebook

Twitter

Copyright 2019 Dayton DUI.
All Rights Reserved.

9:00 - 17:00

Our Opening Hours Mon. - Fri.

Facebook

Twitter

Search
OVI Menu
 

Normal human body temperature Tag

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "Normal human body temperature"

DUI Breath Test Defense: Core Body Temperature as a Defense to a Breath Test

Took the Breath Test and wondering if you still have a case?   The cornerstone of evidential breath testing is the scientific principle called Henry's law, named after pioneering chemist William Henry in 1803.  Henry's Law states, At a constant temperature, the amount of a given gas that dissolves in a given type and volume of liquid is directly proportional to the partial pressure of that gas in equilibrium with that liquid. In evidential breath testing, Henry's Law allows the machine to assume it can measure the alcohol (ethanol)  in your breath as a ratio to the ethanol in your blood.  That is why...

Continue reading

The Partition Ratio Defense; Do We Share a Lung?

Is your lung the same as mine?  The breath test machine assumes that it is.  While scientific studies suggest that lung physiology can have a significant impact on breath alcohol testing, Hlastala, "The Impact of Lung Physiology on Breath Alcohol Testing," 1 DWI Journal: Law and Sciences 5, 31-48 (November/December 1986), the breath testing machines assume that all lungs are the same.  It is assumed for purposes of breath alcohol analysis that a person will exhale air at an average temperature of 34 degrees C.  At that assumed temperature, 2100 milliliters of alveolar air (deep lung air) is assumed to...

Continue reading

Breathalyzers and the Body Temperature Defense

Sources of Error in Breath Testing (Part One)Image via WikipediaDeviations in the normal body temperature can result in an error in the evidentiary breath test.  In his article "Body Temperature and the Breathalyzer Boobytrap," 721 Mich B.J. (1982), Dr. Hlastala confirms that the normal body temperature of a healthy person may"may vary by as much as 1 degree centigrade above or below the normal mean value of 37 degrees centigrade or 1.8 degrees F from the mean value of 98.6 degrees F." The higher the body temperature, the greater the error rate of the breathalyzer machine. LaBianca...

Continue reading