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Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "orc 4511.19"

Presumption of Innocence? Not For OVI

The History of The Presumption of Innocence The presumption of innocence, Ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat.It is the principle that one is considered innocent unless proven guilty. It dates back to the very foundations of western jurisprudence. The sixth century Digest of Justinian provides, as a general rule of evidence:"Proof lies on him who asserts, not on him who denies."The presumption requires that the prosecution has the obligation to prove each element of the offense. They must prove each beyond a reasonable doub. The accused bears no burden of proof. This is often expressed in the phrase innocent until proven...

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Ohio DUI Laws: An Overview

This post collects together in one place many of the Ohio DUI Laws that arise in drunk driving cases.   Some Ohio DUI laws are listed because law enforcement will charge these offenses to establish probable cause for pulling over your vehicle.  If you need to find out more about a specific law, or how the statute has been interpreted or applied, call Charles M. Rowland II at (937) 318-1384 or read about the specific Ohio DUI law at the Ohio DUI Law Blog.Operating a Vehicle Impaired (OVI); O.R.C. 4511.19 This is Ohio's drunk driving statute (Ohio's DUI law).  It is a...

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OVI or DUI (Which is right?)

The current version of Ohio's impaired driving law is O.R.C. 4511.19, is entitled "Operating vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs - OVI."  This is the same offense which is also known as DUI (driving under the influence), OMVI (operating a vehicle impaired), DWI (driving while intoxicated) or drunk driving.  The Ohio General Assembly changed the acronym to connote the broadening of the law from simply alcohol impairment to any drug (or condition?) which may impair.  The term "operate" also has a broader definition than that of "driving."  For example, if a driver is found behind the wheel of...

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The Future of Forced Blood Draws (Missouri v. McNeely)

In what can only be seen as an overwhelming victory for the 4th Amendment, this week the United States Supreme Court decided Missouri v. McNeely which involved the issue of whether or not law enforcement can force a blood draw following a drunk driving arrest without following the warrant requirements of the 4th amendment.  In the ruling the Court sided with the defendant who had been subjected to a blood test without a warrant.  The warrantless blood draw revealed him to be nearly twice the legal limit.  Justice Sotomayor, writing for the majority held that forced extraction of a person’s blood...

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OVI Case Update: State v. Bayer, 2012-Ohio-5469

The question raised in State v. Bayer involved whether or not a person can be sentenced for OVI (O.R.C. 4511.19) if that person is also convicted of Aggravated Vehicular Assault (O.R.C. 2903.08) arising from the same incident.  Crimes that involve similar activity are often merged for purposes of sentencing.  The merger turns on whether or not the crimes are similar enough to be deemed "allied offenses of similar import."In this case, the Defendant caused "serious physical harm" to a person while driving with a prohibited alcohol concentration above 0.17%.  In March 2011 she pled guilty to Aggravated Vehicular Assault and to one...

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DUI Blood Tests: Whole Blood vs. Serum/Plasma

Ohio Administrative Code 3701-53-03(A) sets forth the techniques and methods for determining the concentration of alcohol in blood, urine and other bodily substances.  Pursuant to that rule, Ohio allows for testing including gas chromatography and enzyme assays.  To challenge a blood test, it is important to know if the State has tested the blood as whole blood or as serum/plasma.  Operation with a concentration of alcohol is prohibited if the concentration in whole blood is equal to or exceeds .08%, R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(b).  However, the prohibited concentration for whole blood is a concentration equal to or exceeding .096%, R.C.4511.19(A)(1)(c).  The high...

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Blood & Urine Specimens O.A.C. 3701-53-05

Image via WikipediaOhio Administrative Code section 3701-53-05 applies to the collection of blood and urine specimens.  Section (A) requires all samples to be "collected in accordance with section 4511.19 (DUI statute), or section 1547.11 (Boating Under the Influence) of the Revised Code, as applicable."Section (B) states, "[w]hen collecting a blood sample, an aqueous solution of non-volatile antiseptic shall be used on the skin.  No alcohols shall be used as a skin antiseptic."  A good place to start your DUI investigation is the first blood draw.  We have garnered the help of a legal-nurse-practitioner to find instances where wounds could have...

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