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Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "refusal"

Driving Privileges: Hard Time

15 days if you took the test, 30 days if you did not (First Offense)If you are stopped for an OVI, DUI or drunk driving and you refuse to take a chemical test (breath, blood or urine), or if your test results exceed the legal limit of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC), the police officer can and will take your driver’s license on the spot causing your drivers license to be suspended immediately.  This pre-conviction suspension is called the ADMINISTRATIVE LICENSE SUSPENSION. The ALS is a suspension imposed by the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles and not a suspension imposed by the court.  A court may not grant...

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ALS Appeal: Refusal or Obstruction? (by Dayton DUI)

Often, our clients will tell us that they could not produce a sufficient sample for the requested chemical test.  "I kept trying, but I just could not blow long enough to satisfy the officer."  If they hope that this information will prevent the imposition of an Administrative License Suspension, they may be disappointed.  Ohio DUI law sets a high bar for overcoming the presumption that law enforcement was not at fault for your failure.The validity of a refusal based on physical incapacity to submit a sample requires a factual finding by the court in favor of the accused. Wilder v....

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Ohio’s Implied Consent Law

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="210" caption="Image via Wikipedia"][/caption]In Ohio, any person who operates a vehicle within the state of Ohio is said to have given his or her consent to a chemical test of their blood, breath, or urine to determine alcohol content if arrested for OVI (drunk driving).  Pursuant to recent changes in Ohio OVI law, an OVI suspect has 3 hours to comply with the request to submit to a test, and failure to do so within the 3 hour limit will be considered a "refusal."  Recent changes allow the police to use "whatever reasonable means are necessary to...

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