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Sleep deprivation Tag

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "Sleep deprivation"

Drunk Driving Defense: Sleep Deprivation

Drunk Driving Defense or Sleep Deprivation?Imagine that you come across a person who acts confused, their appearance is disheveled, their eyes are bloodshot and they have an odor of alcohol on their breath.  Are they drunk?What I just described is a person who worked for 17 straight hours at a physically and mentally taxing job.  Instead of going home, he stopped by a co-worker's party, had one beer and then proceeded home.  He was stopped a police officer and arrested for drunk driving.A chronic sleep-restricted state can cause fatigue, daytime sleepiness, clumsiness and weight loss or weight gain  It adversely affects the brain and cognitive...

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Fatigue and the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus Test

Can simple fatigue explain a person's poor performance on the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus test?  According to recent studies the answer is yes.  Here is a link to the first formal study demonstrating that the smooth pursuit portion of the HGN test is affected by fatigue, http://iospress.metapress.com/content/8758844418248700.  The study found that sleep deprivation impaired smooth pursuit. Quoting from the study's abstract: Our findings showed that sleep deprivation deteriorated smooth pursuit gain, smooth pursuit accuracy and saccade velocity. Additionally, the ratio between saccade velocity and saccade amplitude was significantly decreased by sleep deprivation. However, as the length of sleep ...

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Driving Drowsy is Illegal in Ohio

Image via WikipediaOhio Revised Code 4511.79 makes is a minor misdemeanor for a someone to drive "a commercial motor vehicle"  "while the person's ability or alertness is so impaired by fatigue, illness, or other causes that it is unsafe for the person to drive such vehicle."  The law also provides that, "[n]o driver shall use any drug which would adversely affect the driver's ability or alertness."Furthermore, O.R.C. 4511.79(B) prohibits an owner from "knowingly" permitting a driver in any such condition to drive.  Repeated violations result in enhancement of the charge from a minor misdemeanor to a fourth degree misdemeanor.The National...

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