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“Weed Day” How Did 420 Get It’s Name?

Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > DUI Articles  > Announcements  > “Weed Day” How Did 420 Get It’s Name?

“Weed Day” How Did 420 Get It’s Name?

weed dayApril 20th is Weed Day. I am fascinated by the origin of the term “420” and how it became associated with marijuana.  There are as many stories about its origin as there are people you ask.  Just a short search on Google leads to the following “Weed Day” origin stories.

  • It’s the number of active chemicals in marijuana.
  • It’s teatime in Holland.
  • It has something to do with Hitler’s birthday.
  • It’s those numbers in that Bob Dylan song multiplied.
  • It was like a police code for smoking in progress or something.
  • In 2003, when the California Legislature codified the medical marijuana law that voters had approved, the bill was named SB 420.

Let’s Get Some Answers!

It turns out that I’m not the only one who wanted a “Weed Day” answer. Some heavy hitting investigators were unleashed over at Huffington Post.  Their story focuses on a group of five San Rafael High School friends known as the “Waldos.” These friends were known by their hangout spot. The location was a wall outside the school. They coined the term in 1971. “The Waldos’ story goes like this: One day in the fall of 1971 — harvest time — the Waldos got word of a Coast Guard service member who could no longer tend his plot of marijuana plants near the Point Reyes Peninsula Coast Guard station.

A treasure map in hand, the Waldos decided to pluck some of the free bud. The Waldos, who were all athletes, agreed to meet at the statue of Louis Pasteur outside the school at 4:20 p.m., after practice, to begin the hunt.” (link).

Whatever story you choose to believe, there is no doubt that “420” has become a day celebrating the struggle for legalization of marijuana and continued research into medical uses of marijuana.  We stand ready to help you in Ohio if you are accused of driving while high, driving under the influence of drugs, driving under the influence (DUI), or operating a vehicle under the influence of marijuana (OVI).

Charles Rowland

charlie@daytondui.com

Charles M. Rowland II has been representing the accused drunk driver for over 20 years. Contact him at (937) 318-1384 if you find yourself facing a DUI (now called OVI) charge.

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