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Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "HGN" (Page 2)

DUI Blood Tests: Whole Blood vs. Serum/Plasma

Ohio Administrative Code 3701-53-03(A) sets forth the techniques and methods for determining the concentration of alcohol in blood, urine and other bodily substances.  Pursuant to that rule, Ohio allows for testing including gas chromatography and enzyme assays.  To challenge a blood test, it is important to know if the State has tested the blood as whole blood or as serum/plasma.  Operation with a concentration of alcohol is prohibited if the concentration in whole blood is equal to or exceeds .08%, R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(b).  However, the prohibited concentration for whole blood is a concentration equal to or exceeding .096%, R.C.4511.19(A)(1)(c).  The high...

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DaytonDUI, Defending a Breath Test Case

"I'll Huff and I'll Puff and Blow Your House Down" Did you know that your breathing pattern can significantly alter the concentration of alcohol on your evidential breath test?  According to scientific research, "[t]he subject's test manner of breathing just prior to providing breath for analysis can significantly alter the concentration of alcohol in the resulting exhalation." (Jones, 1982, Schoknecht, 1989) as cited in Physiological Aspecs of Breath-Alcohol Measurement, Alcohol Drugs & Driving Vol. 6, No. 2, A.W. Jones.Hyperventilation "...

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Admissibility of the Standardized Field Sobriety Tests – Statutory Rules

Ohio Revised Code 4511.19(D)(4)(b) sets forth the law on admissibility of the standardized field sobriety tests in Ohio.  It reads, in pertinent part: (b) In any criminal prosecution or juvenile court proceeding for a violation of division (A) or (B) of this section, of a municipal ordinance relating to operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol, a drug of abuse, or alcohol and a drug of abuse, or of a municipal ordinance relating to operating a vehicle with a prohibited concentration of alcohol, a controlled substance, or a metabolite of a controlled substance in the whole blood, blood serum...

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“Hiding the Ball” in Ohio DUI Cases

ODH and the Disappearing Intoxilyzer 8000 RecordsOne of the proposed benefits of the adoption of the Intoxilyzer 8000 was to be the consolidation of breath test records in one place.  Previously, breath test records were maintained by the individual police departments.  Implementation and maintenance of the Intoxilyzer 8000 is the responsibility of the Ohio Department of Health and specifically the ODH's Bureau of Alcohol and Drug Testing.  The Ohio Department of Health has started a web site containing all information about breath tests in the state, called the Breath Instrument Data Center. [HERE]  Records were to be available on-line and...

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The Prescription Drug Defense

While many people think of impaired driving as involving alcohol, we are increasingly seeing people accused of being impaired by prescription drugs.  Clients are surprised to learn that the same harsh penalties that apply to alcohol impairment also apply to prescription drug impairment.  You need an attorney who knows how to fight a drugged driving case.Drugged driving cases involving prescription drugs present a problem for law enforcement as indicators of prescription drug use are less apparent.  The standardized field sobriety tests are crude tools for detecting alcohol and may be useless in determining prescription drug impairment.  Challenging the officer's observations...

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Intoxilyzer 8000 Is Unreliable!

Today, in State v. Heather Reid, Case No. TRC 1100716 in the Circleville Municipal Court, Judge Gary Dumm has ruled that "The State of Ohio cannot expect this Court to find the Intoxilyzer 8000 reliable when the State refuses to address known problems and explain why those problems can be ignored."The Court calls for independent laboratory testing to address the issues raised by the adoption of the Intoxilyzer 8000: RFI, sample size of the chamber, volume of the sample tested, possible operator manipulation of the results, possible CMI modifications of the software without the knowledge of ODH and slope detector...

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Ohio DUI Law: State v. Haneberg (HGN While Seated In Patrol Car)

The 9th District Court of Appeals issued a great decision on the issue of substantial compliance.  Specifically, the issue involved giving the HGN test while the Defendant was seated in the car.  The Court found that this was not substantial compliance. (State v. Haneberg 5/29/2007, 2007-Ohio-2561, 9th District Court of Appeals).  If you need a DUI/OVI attorney anywhere in Dayton or the Miami Valley, contact Charles M. Rowland II at 937-318-1DUI (318-1384) or visit www.DaytonDUI.com ....

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Morphine, Heroin and the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus

In the past years, my office has seen an increase in the number of “drugged” driving cases we receive. While arrests for marijuana make up the vast majority of those cases, we are also seeing a dramatic rise in prescription drug cases along with traffic stops implicating harder drugs such morphine and heroin.As with other impaired driving cases, it is vital that you know the observations that would be consistent with impairment by that drug.  It is also vital that you determine if the “standardized field sobriety test” protocol adopted in Ohio is applicable in recognizing clues of impairment due...

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Fatigue and the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus Test

Can simple fatigue explain a person's poor performance on the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus test?  According to recent studies the answer is yes.  Here is a link to the first formal study demonstrating that the smooth pursuit portion of the HGN test is affected by fatigue, http://iospress.metapress.com/content/8758844418248700.  The study found that sleep deprivation impaired smooth pursuit. Quoting from the study's abstract: Our findings showed that sleep deprivation deteriorated smooth pursuit gain, smooth pursuit accuracy and saccade velocity. Additionally, the ratio between saccade velocity and saccade amplitude was significantly decreased by sleep deprivation. However, as the length of sleep ...

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Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus; terms at a glance

Image via WikipediaDayton DUI Attorney Charles M. Rowland is the only attorney in Ohio to hold certification in Forensic Sobriety Assessment and he has been trained in the administration and evaluation of the Standardized Field Sobriety Tests in the same methods that law enforcement officers are trained to use.  Because of this training he is qualified to challenge the administration of the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN) test at a motion to suppress hearing or at your DUI trial.  The HGN is a test of your eyes wherein the testing officer is looking for abnormal movements call saccades. ...

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