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Dayton DUI Attorney Charles Rowland > Posts tagged "dui penalties" (Page 3)

Prior Convictions Used To Enhance An OVI

It is not uncommon for a client to choose my representation on a second, third, or fourth OVI offense.  One of the first things we check is whether or not the client was represented by an attorney in the previous convictions.  We also check to see if the prior plea had a valid waiver of counsel.  Both of these issues were addressed by the Ohio Supreme Court in State v. Brooke, 113 Ohio St. 3d 199, 2007-Ohio-1533, 863 N.E. 2d 1024 (2007), wherein the Court stated: Generally, a past conviction cannot be attacked in a subsequent case.  However, there is a...

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What Does A DUI Cost?

What does a DUI defense cost?  We encounter many people who want a rational, economic justification for hiring an OVI attorney on a first offense OVI.  The only study I could find on this topic was a 2006 Texas Department of Transportation study which calculated the costs of a drunk driving conviction "in that state showed the total costs of a DWI arrest and conviction for a first-time offender with no accident involved would range from $9,000 to $24,000." [source]  In a story from CNBC citing that study, they speculate that total costs, absent you losing your job, could range...

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Roadside Seizure: Some Definitions (by DaytonDUI)

There are a number of legal terms that apply to the government's ability to take your stuff.  Here is a guide to help you understand the different terms which may apply to your case.1. Seizure.  Your car may be subject to seizure at roadside at the time of your arrest under certain circumstances.  The officer's decision on whether or not to impound in an OVI arrest are governed by R.C. 4511.195. However, seizure of your vehicle is required for the following offenses,A second or greater OVI within six years, and any felony OVI offense. see R.C. 4511.19(G)(1)(b)(v), R.C. 4511.19(G)(1)(d)(v) and...

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Ohio OVI Penalties

Ohio's legislature is constantly tinkering with the OVI statute, R.C. 4511.19.  This can be tough on attorneys trying to provide information in the internet age as internet articles and blog posts are not bio-degradable.  The law changes and old posts do not.  One site that provides constant updates on the current OVI penalties is Judge Jennifer Weiler's site at the Garfield Heights Municipal Court.  Her charts are used in every courtroom in Ohio to keep legal professionals current on Ohio's OVI law.  She has provided an invaluable service. You can find information on Ohio's OVI penalties by clicking here:Ohio Impaired...

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The Montgomery County Jail (by Dayton DUI)

The Montgomery County Jail, located at 330 W. Second St., in downtown Dayton, Ohio is a 900 bed facility serving multiple jurisdictions throughout Montgomery County including the Vandalia Municipal Court; Miamisburg Municipal Court; Kettering Municipal Court; Montgomery County Municipal Courts (Eastern and Western Divisions) and the Montgomery County Common Pleas Court.  If you are arrested for DUI/OVI in any of these jurisdictions, you may be booked into the Montgomery County Jail.  You can contact the jail at (937)225-4160 or visit the jail web site HERE.  To check whether or not someone is incarcerated in the Montgomery County Jail, you can visit HERE.Bond...

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MADD’s Historic Push For A .05% Alcohol Limit (by Dayton DUI)

In 1938 the American Medical Association created a "Committee to Study Problems of Motor Vehicle Accidents."  Around that same time the National Safety Council began the "Committee on Tests for Intoxication." Their original research found that a driver with a .15% Blood Alcohol Concentration (B.A.C.) could be presumed to be "under the influence." Ohio law followed this paradigm making it illegal to drive with a B.A.C. over .15%.  This standard existed for over 20 years.Law and politics changed forever with the founding of Mothers Against Drunk Driving in the late 1970's.  MADD changed the world for the better.  No longer...

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Effects Of An OVI Conviction (by DaytonDUI.com)

How does a DUI conviction affect you?  A drunk driving charge can affect you in ways that you may not expect. Listed below are some of the more vexing issues associated with an Ohio DUI (OVI). 1. Child Custody - If you are involved in a custody dispute (or have a vindictive spouse who would like to start one), a DUI/OVI conviction can be used against you in domestic relations court.  Automatic suspensions may make it difficult to exercise visitation with your children.  You may also find a court who will refuse to let you transport the children due to a DUI/OVI conviction, thereby increasing the...

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Will I Have “Party Plates?” (by DaytonDUI)

If you thought that public shaming was a barbaric practice relegated to the distant past, you have not been driving through Ohio.  Ohio was the first state in the country to adopt a form of public humiliation by adopting special license plates for drunk driving offenders.  Use of the "scarlet letter" plates became mandatory in 2004. O.R.C. 4507.02(F)(2) and 4503.231.  These bright yellow plates with prominent red lettering (often referred to as party plates) are an indelible record of your offense and will not be easily forgotten by friends, family, customers and clients.  At DaytonDUI we are opposed to "branding,"...

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A First Offense OVI In Ohio

A first offense OVI is defined at O.R.C. 4511.19 as a DUI with no priors within 6 years.  A first offense OVI can be charged in three ways.  The first charge is caused by testing over the legal limit of .08% B.A.C. (example O.R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(d)).  These types of offenses are also referred to as “per se”  violations.  A second way to be charged is for violating the high-tier provision of Ohio’s OVI law.  Ohio has also created a per se “high-tier” limit of .17% BrAC, sometimes referred to as a SUPER-OVI.  The per se high-tier limits for a first offense OVI are set forth at O.R.C. 4511.19(A)(1)(f) The person...

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